ON A KINDER NOTE with Dolly's Dream | Why teens don't block and report cyber bullying and what parents can do

BLOCKED: Teens are much more likely to block someone for cyber bullying them than to tell a teacher.
BLOCKED: Teens are much more likely to block someone for cyber bullying them than to tell a teacher.

Blocking is one of the most common tactics teens can use when they are bullied online.

Teens are much more likely to block someone for cyber bullying them than to tell a teacher.

However, the majority of cyber bullied teens still don't block and it's even less common for them to report bullying to the website where it happened.

So, what can parents do?

1. Understand the tech

Start with Australia's eSafety Guide, which explains the most popular social media and gaming sites, including how to report inappropriate messaging, control who sees your information, and stop someone contacting you.

2. Talk with your teens

Most young Australians who take formal action against cyber bullying, such as reporting it to the website, have also confided in someone they trust, like a parent or friend.

3. Explore other tactics

Many social media platforms offer other ways to reduce contact. Talk to your teens about whether they would 'restrict', 'remove', 'ignore', 'mute', or 'take a break' from someone.

4. Contact the eSafety Commissioner

Children under 18 or their parents/carers can contact the eSafety Commissioner to get serious cyber bullying material removed.