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The Informer: Let 'Freedom Day' arising from COVID restrictions be the catalyst for appreciating life's essentials

As more areas ease their COVID restrictions, there are warnings that the nation's health system would face more pressure from rising case numbers. Picture: Brendan McCarthy
As more areas ease their COVID restrictions, there are warnings that the nation's health system would face more pressure from rising case numbers. Picture: Brendan McCarthy

It's dubbed "Freedom Day" and it applies to jurisdictions across the country that have recently eased COVID lockdown restrictions.

NSW's reopening began on Monday after almost 63,000 cases with the ACT reaching a checkpoint a few days later.

The latter has also expanded the list of NSW postcodes where ACT residents may travel for any reason without needing to quarantine when they return.

The most populous state has also announced it would scrap quarantine for international arrivals into NSW from November 1.

While we can read all the books we want about what freedom means, the concept, much like most things in life, can only be better understood from an experience that shakes us out of apathy.

While understandings can be relative, the impact of COVID and the various roadmaps out of lockdown should be considered such an experience to help us, moving forward, not take every day and essentials for granted.

This includes, perhaps most importantly, the essential workers who have worked hard to get us here.

The cost of freedom from easing COVID restrictions is the flow-on to the nation's hospitals with warnings that the system is facing a deadly bottleneck as it braces itself for a rise in cases.

ANU medicine lecturer Dr David Caldicott said it is currently being "held together by the goodwill and broken bodies of healthcare workers, and the smell of an oily rag".

We can celebrate freedom and should try to manage the cost of that freedom at the same time.

Victorians remain restricted with the state recording 1993 new coronavirus cases since Friday.

Sadly for Tasmania, a part of the state has gone into lockdown after an infected NSW man absconded from hotel quarantine.

Staying with the zeitgeist of today, the push and pull between the office and working from home continues to be a focus.

We will have to wait and see how it settles, but a new research shows that flexible workers are happier.

The study by the NSW government and Edith Cowan University found that remote workers reported less trouble sleeping and sense that their comfort and emotional security are being better looked after despite the social isolation.

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*This edition of The Informer was written by Canberra Times reporter Toby Vue. If you'd like to show your support for the team behind The Informer, why not forward us to a friend?

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This story Let 'Freedom Day' be the catalyst for appreciating everyday life first appeared on The Canberra Times.