Documentary explores importance of healthy soil

The Need to Grow will be screened at The People Place in Busselton on January 30, 2020 followed by a Q and A session. Tickets are $10 and can be booked by phoning 9752 3550. Image supplied.
The Need to Grow will be screened at The People Place in Busselton on January 30, 2020 followed by a Q and A session. Tickets are $10 and can be booked by phoning 9752 3550. Image supplied.

The People Place will be screening the multi award winning documentary The Need to Grow, which explores the importance of healthy soil.

The film's directors Rob Herring and Ryan Wirick said a UN report titled Wake Up Before It's Too Late stated localising and diversifying food supply and increasing small organic farms was key to fixing the food system.

The directors said there was a need for people to stop relying on chemical dependent, soil eroding and nutrient lacking GMO monocultures.

"TIME magazine estimated that at our current rate of soil degradation, we only have roughly 60 years of farmable topsoil left on the planet," they said.

The People Place chairman Tony Robinson bought rights to the film and will screen it at 19-21 Kent Street, Busselton from 7pm on January 30.

The screening will be followed by a Q and A session with two school students, permaculturalists Julie Howes and Jarrod Kennedy, soil expert Brent Burns, biodiversity lecturer Patrick Prevett, City of Busselton mayor Grant Henley and Vasse MLA Libby Mettam.

"It's about the impact of food sustainability and what the UN said about there being 60 years of farmable soil left," he said.

"After that soil will be destroyed by a lot of chemicals from the way we have farmed.

"It is a story about how individuals can make a difference. Come see it and find out yourself."

The film follows the stories of three individuals including an eight-year old girl who stopped GMO going into Girl Scouts cookies.

A man who created a green power house which uses waste that would end up in landfill to accelerate the soil regeneration cycle, a process which would take 400 years in nature.

The power house generates enough off-grid energy to power 100 homes and sequesters more than one tonne of carbon each day.

"He did it in an hour, it is a phenomenal thing," Mr Robinson said.

"There is also a story about an agronomist who grows food in a different way using soils and materials, which basically shows people how they can do their bit in their garden and how they can grow the most beautiful foods."

Mr Robinson said it was not a film about climate change but basic solutions that individuals like all of us could participate in.

"I thought it was so important I wanted to show it to the people in Busselton, there are a lot of people who grow their own veggies but they do not realise the chemicals they are using are actually destroying the soil," he said.

"We have to encourage people to use natural things which are there. We have to wake up. There is so much we can do at a local level."